What Your Doctor May NOT Tell You About Premenopause

doctor may not tell you

What Your Doctor May NOT Tell You About Premenopause: Balance your hormones and your life from thrity to fifty by John Lee, M.D. and Jesse Hanley, M.D. Originally published in 1999. 395 pages.

‘Kay, folks. I read this one almost two months ago, and told myself that I wasn’t going to review it until I had tested the suggestions a bit. Then I tested the suggestions, found a couple of them were not only healthy but genuinely helpful, and still waffled on reviewing it.

Sunday, I handed it to a friend of mine who I thought might be helped by it, and realized that I was avoiding reviewing it because…well, it’s another public declaration of my stage of life. But it’s a great book, and the health improvement suggestions are not only very efffective, they align with my ideals as well. So I’m getting over myself long enough to recommend this book. It’s that good, and I want to share this information with other women.

If my hormones had started wigging out at 40, or I’d had time to process the gradual changes many women report experiencing starting at 35, I might have been better prepared for stuff. However, I was humming along like clockwork with nary the faintest hint of anything out of the ordinary for 45 years. Very recently, little things popped up here and there, and my desire to keep living my normal life in all respects sent me on a hunt for answers, and that hunt led me to this book.

People (ahem, like me) heard Suzanne Somers going on about not having life hindered by hormonal changes and laughed. If I met her today, I would offer her my apologies nd join her on a tour to tell every woman over 40 that you really don’t have to have your life, moods, and sex life turned upside down by the calendar. You can find what to do, how and why by reading this book.

One of the things I appreciated about it was that these are OB/Gyns who openly and defiantly advise women to ignore most of the conventional medical wisdom and toxic prescriptions offered by most gynecological professionals. A second thing I appreciated about them was that they had an entire chapter dedicated to the deadly and damaging nature of artificial birth control. They actually advocate the calendar method for those couples interested in child spacing.

They strongly discourage elective surgeries to handle issues caused by wild hormonal swings or conditions such as menorrhagia. They strongly discourage estrogen-like replacement alternatives as well, although they don’t spend much time on that since the book is written for women who are not yet menopausal. Perhaps in five years I’ll pick up the next book.

They go into great detail about how our hormones really work. For instance, that it’s not a decrease in estrogen but progestrone that is the culprit when pre-menopausal women first start to experience problems. That alone was very enlightening for me, as well as the less expensive, non drug, all natural, bioidentical hormonal supplements and replacements that work with a woman’s body rather than against it. In other words, unlike progestins orΒ  ERT, natural hormones won’t make you gain weight or increase your risk of developing cancer later in life.

After making several of the adjustments outlined in the book, and probably because I got started working the problem at the first sign of trouble, I have seen a lot of success with every bit of the advice I tried. From greater ease of weight management, to an immediate return to regular cycles, to better sleep. It was actually quite remarkable, until I stopped to consider that the natural way, using the stuff that God created, should yield the best results.

I suppose my grade for this book is obvious, but for the sake of consistency, I’ll offer one.

Grade: A

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3 thoughts on “What Your Doctor May NOT Tell You About Premenopause

  1. hearthie August 17, 2017 / 11:45 am

    Els clued me in on the cream, which I’ve been trying… it’s only week two, so I’m certain this will change, but so far I’m sleeping better, my appetite has increased without a concurrent weight increase, and I lost a burr of irritation that had newly developed in the last six months. I need to pick up this book!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Elspeth August 17, 2017 / 6:41 pm

    I feel pretty certain that you are already doing most of what they recommend Hearth.

    You limit carbs, sugar, hormone laden meat. They don’t like dairy but that’s your joy in eating, so…

    You exercise and are working on weight management. With the exception of taking Vitex (a natural, herbal hormone balancing supplement), the biggest bonus left for you to get from the book is the information and science of how our hormones shift.

    But that was a big bonus for me because it was helpful to know that estrogen is just a fraction of the puzzle.

    Like

  3. hearthie August 17, 2017 / 8:40 pm

    I’m on page 113… and seriously thinking that the stress I was under for the first six months of this year might have had something to do with how I feel now. And the “go sit DOWN” mode I’m in with God ATM. (I do eat hormone meat, but my dairy is pastured and hormone free). I think I need to take my multis again tho…
    So much of this stuff is cumulative, and thank you Mom… I have had a whole lifetime of not eating processed crap. And I am normally good about stress management. Not recently, but normally I am. The rest, perhaps I’ll email you later… LOL the TMI police might come after me. πŸ˜€

    Like

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