Uncategorized

Blogkeeping notes.

There is a new page on the menu. Those of you who were here reading when I first started writing in this sleepy corner of the web may remember that I had a page devoted to links I’d encountered that I wanted to share. I was saving those links on Delicious, which has since vanished into the ether. I had hoped to find a link sharing site that I enjoyed using as much as I did Delicious, but I never did, so I kissed my hundreds of links good bye 😦 and took down the page.

I decided recently that I would just make a new page and add any interesting links I read there. Some ideas are worth sharing, contemplating, and thinking about. Books are my preferred method since ideas are better fleshed out in them, whether I agree with them or not. But this is the age of the Internet, and the germs of most ideas can be found here as well. Hence the Links Worth a Look page.

I updated the comment policy to more accurately reflect the mood of this site. Namely, I turned off moderation because -hopefully- it’s pretty clear that I don’t need to moderate very heavily here. First time commentators will still go to the moderation process first, but other than that, comments can flow freely. Unless and until but some weird quirk I find that particular change was a mistake.

Just a couple of notes to update my readers of a few small changes on the blog.

Y’all have a great weekend, and try to stay cool, huh?

 

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joys of reading, the business of books, Uncategorized

Kindle strikes again.

I am an avid library patron. I try more often than not to read books with pages, patronize bookstores, and generally be a good little bibliophile. Books are important. Despite imagining myself fighting the good fight against a digital takeover of reading for myself and for my kids, I just – like 5 minutes ago- downloaded My Man Jeeves onto my Kindle for 0.99. I am not beyond a great deal.

I recently re-blogged posts (here and here) which illustrate the education I’ve been obtaining on Amazon’s book sales pricing and practices. There is definitely cause to pause and consider alternatives to Amazon when purchasing books. I’ve been more careful about taking those things into consideration. I even bought a Barnes and Noble membership which isn’t a complete waste because I buy almost all of our kids’ assigned literature books from Barnes and Noble to the tune of about 12 books a year.

Nevertheless, I own a Kindle. Kindle makes it very easy to download and store a boat load of books at reasonable prices, which makes it very easy to open it, shop, and click my way to a great read in a convenient and inexpensive format.  I often find good books there for free, such as a book I recently reviewed, Miss Maitland Private Secretary.

The downside is that is very easy to nickel and dime my way to spending too much on books when it would be easier to go to the library and check them out. Thankfully, my genuine love of the library creates a very low risk of that happening. When it comes to the value of local libraries, I am a true believer. As such, I rarely purchase a book to download on the Kindle more than once a month.

My Kindle library still isn’t as big as my physical library, but the ease with which I can amass books to read later means the Kindle library could rival the book shelf in the near future. Ease of use, an extensive list of titles and rock bottom prices makes it easier to buy books from Amazon.

I always buy our kids books with physical pages to turn, or check them out from the library because the last thing they need at this point is another screen, even if it’s for a good use such as reading good books. That also keeps me in libraries and books stores more often than I might be if we encouraged them to read digital books. However, I am not a paper book purist, nor even on an all out boycott of Amazon books. I do however, like to consider these things when I spend my money.

This bibliographic stream of consciousness brought to you courtesy of Kindle, My Man Jeeves, and the fact that I am a sucker for a 0.99 book, which together inspired these thoughts.

fiction, iconic characters, joy of reading, novels, Uncategorized

Engrossing Governesses.

Image result for emma movie images
Gwyneth Paltrow as Emma

A few days ago, I got a sudden desire to watch the 1996 Hollywood adaptation of Jane Austen’s Emma. As I watched it, the trajectory of Mrs. Weston, the titular character’s former governess, had me musing about the governesses I’ve encountered in my literary travels. Specifically, I wondered what would be the modern day equivalent of the young to not so young governess who, whether by stroke of luck, true love, or mercenary social climbing, finds herself the unlikely mistress of a house.

In addition to Mrs. Weston, I was reminded of Jane Eyre, the heroine of one of my favorite books. Despite the rather dismal plight that Jane suffers from one season of life to the next, she still manages to hold her character and convictions in the highest state, and at the end of it all, marries the man she loves and even has a son.

The last governess turned mistress I thought of was the mercenary Becky Sharp, from the novel Vanity Fair. A beautiful yet vicious social climber who can both blush and cry at will, the only bit of raw emotion we ever get from her is when she realizes her folly in marrying one wealthy man when she actually could have married his even more wealthy (and definitely more powerful) father. She is without question, of a different mold than the governesses mentioned above.

I’m interested in whether or not anyone reading here has a favorite or memorable literary governess I should investigate along my literary journey.

Related- Iconic Characters: Mr. Knightley

*I was torn between watching the PBS adaptation of Emma or the big budget adaptation. The quandary was based on the fact that although I preferred Gwyneth Paltrow’s performance in the title role of the feature film, I preferred Johnnie Lee Miler’s  PBS interpretation of Mr. Knightley light year’s more than the actor who portrayed Knightley in the feature film. I feel strongly about Mr. Knightley, as you may remember from the post linked above. You may not also notice that I never had much use for Mr. Darcy.

 

Els' Rabbit Trails, tales from the local library, Uncategorized

On lost library books…

…and the resulting loss of dollars.

As much as I love the library, there is the occasional downside to checking out books there. Among those are late fees and lost books.

One of the things I like about our library is that not only do you get three weeks to read your plunder, but you also get three renewals so long as the book isn’t being waited for by another library patron. I routinely keep books for nine weeks. Routinely, and not because it takes me nine weeks to read a book, though that has been known to happen.

No, I keep books for nine weeks because with three bookshelves in the house, and the tendency to read books everywhere from the bathroom to the kitchen, to the car, I often misplace books.  Usually, I find them before they are due and avoid fines. Occasionally, however, they are not found before the nine weeks are up, and fines start to accrue.

Depending on the book (hard cover or paperback, new or old, in demand or no one cares), I risk the fines in the hopes that the book will turn up. It’s worth it to me to pay $3 in fines on a $29 book and the more valauble the book, the more diligent the search, and the more likely it is to be found.

Some books however, such as the one which inspired this mini post, make more sense to just pay for. It’s a really cheap book, despite inspiring more conversation here than this blog has ever experienced before or since. So when the nine weeks and a few days expired, I reported it lost and paid for it. Total of around $12, if I recall correctly.

I just found it. I’ll take it to the library, and they’ll give me back half of what I paid them for the loss. Sigh.

Files this one under tales from the local library.

 

Els' Rabbit Trails, joys of reading, just for fun, Uncategorized

Deciding when to purchase hard copy vs. digital books

Image result for book vs kindle images

Not all books are created equally, and by extension, we make judgements about how we want to invest our time and treasure into the books we consider reading.

I recently found myself making the decision to forgo purchasing a Kindle download of a book that I want to read when it is released on May 8th. The temptation to do so was strong, because acquiring it via Kindle means I could read it during our fast approaching vacation.

However, upon further thought, I decided that this particular book was one I preferred to own in hard copy so that it would be around for years to come. Digital, despite our heavy cultural and occupational dependence on it, is quite fragile.Ask anyone who has lost a treasure trove of digitally stored photgraphs!

Despite the ease of being able to carry thousands of books around with us in one digital device, hard copy books are sometimes worth the expense and the attendant sacrificing of real estate on the book shelf.

It often seems implausible to us in this technological age of easy access to information, but there have been many books written about, movies filmed depicting, and periods in history when unapproved books or literature were sought out for destruction as dangerous to possess. The book I am purchasing doesn’t appear to be remotely at risk of ever being such a book. Nevertheless, it is one that I believe is worth having in hard copy rather than digital. So, I’ll have to wait an extra week before I can order it.

Other books, such as Miss Maitland Private Secretary, are definitely for my reading purposes, best purchased in digital format or borrowed from the library. As enjoyable as it was, it didn’t rise to the level of a book to build a library with in the way novels such as Jane Eyre, Peter Pan, or If Beale Street Could Talk might.

As I considered these questions I thought of the number of books I’ve read as part of Christian mommy book clubs or must read magazine lists that I later wished I had borrowed from the library or purchased in a cheaper, less cluttery format. There are still several of them on my bookshelves, just waiting to be donated.

This thought exploration made me curious how many readers here make similar disticntions when purchasing books. How do you decide which ones are worth buying in hard copy form for your personal  library,which ones are worth buying the digital downloads, and which are best borrowed from the library?

Picture credit, Tim Challies, whose linked article dovetails with this one.

fiction, Mystery, novels, Uncategorized

Miss Maitland, Private Secretary

Miss Maitland, Private Secretary, by Geraldine Bonner. Kindle edition. A Public Domain book. Originally published in 1919.

Plot synopsis: This is the story of a very affluent New York couple who, beginning with the divorce of their irresponsible daughter, find themselves embroiled in one crisis after another. The hits keep coming, culminating with the abduction of their only and beloved granddaughter, whom they  go to extraordinary lengths to find and bring home unharmed. In the middle of it is their trusted, reserved, private, and beautiful social secretary, the titular character Miss Esther Maitland.

Since the vast majority of the books I read are nonfiction, I was a little restless for something fun to read. Even though I don’t summarily dismiss books due to racy content, I do make a conscious effort to avoid books with gratuitous racy content, and I’ve found that the best way to get a book that is both a great romp and good clean fun is to look for books written during a certain time frame. I stumbled on this Geraldine Bonner classic perusing Amazon, and I am very glad that I did.

This book has it all:  intrigue, mystery, unrequited love, and nearly every manifestation of human nature is on display. In other words, Miss Maitland, Private Secretary is both a great romp and good clean fun.

It was intriguing to me that Miss Maitland both loomed large and hovered in the periphery of the action throughout most of the book. Indeed, the book’s title seemed increasingly strange to me as I read the book. However, as the story unfolded, it became clear that despite the character’s absence from the center of all the action, she was the impetus -whether because envy, malice, justice or love- which drove many of the characters and their actions from the beginning of the story to the end of it.

The best part of the book for me was that in the case of one of the mysteries, I had no idea whodunnit until the very end. That doesn’t happen very often, and alone is worth a recommendation.

If you want a fun, quick summer read, you won’t go wrong with Miss Maitland, Private Secretary by Geraldine Bonner. If you have a Kindle, you can even read it for free.

Grade: B+ for fun factor and good writing.

Content: It’s clean, but it’s not a kid book. There’s divorce, adultery, and peril. The entire book runs from beginning to end with adult themes.